What cheating fisherman and improper hazardous waste storage have in common

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Manufacturers storing raw material from paint to corrosives will face much heftier fines and stiffer “we got you” sanctions – all the way up to temporary plant closures – if storage cabinets don’t meet regulations.

– By Isaac Rudik at Compliance Solutions Canada – a Nimonik Affiliate Partner

As anyone who fishes can attest, getting caught over the limit –- whether it’s one too many trout on a line in an isolated, northern lake or a huge trawler netting too many tons of albacore in the middle of the open ocean -– can result in a hefty fine and other stiff sanctions.

The idea is to levy a penalty large enough so that fishers loose the value of their catch plus fork over a painful, “don’t ever do that again” fine.

Now, improperly storing hazardous materials will trigger even higher fines, and for the same reason

The Ministry of Environment is adopting the same approach as fish and game wardens to penalise companies improperly handling and storing hazardous material. When fully implemented, manufacturers who store raw material from paint to corrosives and other contaminants will face much heftier fines and stiffer, “we caught you red handed,” sanctions – all the way up to temporary plant closures – if storage cabinets do not comply with regulations.

The reason behind the tough, new and potentially very costly tactic is because a leading cause of industrial fires is improperly stored and handled flammable liquids. To minimize the hazard, the government wants businesses to identify and inventory any chemicals in the workplace, storing them in code-compliant safety cabinets. If an inspector finds non-compliance, the days of a slap on the wrist are gone.

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